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         Speech Disorders:     more books (100)
  1. Motor Speech Disorders: Substrates, Differential Diagnosis, and Management by Joseph R. Duffy PhD, Mayo Clinic, 2005-02-01
  2. Interventions for Speech Sound Disorders (Communication and Language Intervention) (Communication and Language Intervention Series) by A.Lynn Williams, Sharynne McLeod, et all 2010-02-20
  3. Motor Speech Disorders: Diagnosis & Treatment (Singular Textbook Series) by Ph.D.Donald B Freed, 1999-11-23
  4. Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders: A Guide for the Teacher (3rd Edition) by Barbara J. Hall, Herbert J. Oyer, et all 2000-09-10
  5. Articulation and Phonological Disorders (6th Edition) by John E. Bernthal, Nicholas W. Bankson, et all 2008-08-02
  6. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Childrenwith Speech Disorder by Karen Dodd, 2005-12-05
  7. Terminology of Communication Disorders: Speech-Language-Hearing by Lucille Nicolosi, Elizabeth Harryman, et all 2003-10-20
  8. Management of Motor Speech Disorders in Children and Adults by Kathryn M. Yorkston, David R. Beukelman, et all 2010-01-15
  9. Childhood Speech, Language & Listening Problems: What Every Parent Should Know by Patricia McAleer Hamaguchi, 2001-08-03
  10. Children's Speech Sound Disorders by Caroline Bowen, 2009-06-18
  11. Motor Speech Disorders by Frederic L. Darley PhD, Arnold E. Aronson PhD, et all 1975-05-01
  12. Speech Disorders Resource Guide for Preschool Children (Singular Resource Guide Series) by A. Lynn Williams, 2002-09-30
  13. The Parents Guide to Speech and Language Problems by Debbie Feit, 2007-07-23
  14. Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence: Assessment and Intervention by Rhea Paul PhDCCC-SLP, 2006-09-28

1. Q&A: Phonological Disorders, Functional Speech Disorders, Apraxia, Dysarthria
Provided by Caroline Bowen, SpeechLanguage Pathologist, this page describes apraxia and several other speech disorders.
http://members.tripod.com/Caroline_Bowen/phonol-and-artic.htm
Home Contents
Children's Speech Sound Disorders
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Introduction: Phonology / Speech Development

Developmental Phonological Disorders

Functional Speech Disorders

Developmental Apraxia of Speech (Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia)
...
Download related information in PDF Format
There is more information on this topic on the downloads page. DISCUSSION GROUP Introduction What is speech?
Speech is the spoken medium of language. The other two "mediums" or "forms" of language are writing and gestures. Gestures range from simple iconic movements, like pretending to drink, through to complex finger-spelling and sign systems. What is phonology?
Phonology is a branch of linguistics. It is concerned with the study of the sound systems of languages. The aims of phonology are to demonstrate the patterns of distinctive sound contrasts in a language, and to explain the ways speech sounds are organised and represented in the mind. The term "phonology" is used clinically as a referent to an individual’s speech sound system - for example, "her phonology" might refer to "her phonological system", or "her phonological development".

2. NICHCY- Info About Speech And Language Disorders
General information about Speech and Language Disorders including definition, incidence, characteristics, educational implications, and a list of
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

3. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Speech Disorders
speech disorders include several speechrelated problems that result in Boys are three to four times as likely to experience speech disorders as girls.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001430.htm
@import url(/medlineplus/images/advanced.css); Skip navigation
Medical Encyclopedia
Other encyclopedia topics: A-Ag Ah-Ap Aq-Az B-Bk ... Z
Speech disorders
Contents of this page: Alternative names Articulation deficiency; Voice disorders; Dysfluency Definition Return to top Speech disorders include several speech-related problems that result in impaired or ineffective oral communication. Also see speech impairment Causes, incidence, and risk factors Return to top Speech is one of the primary ways we communicate with our environment. It is also an effective way to monitor normal growth and development as well as to identify potential problems. Dysfluencies are rhythm disorders that are usually characterized by the repetition of a sound, word, or phrase. Stuttering is, perhaps, the most serious dysfluency. Articulation deficiencies involve sounds made incorrectly or inappropriately. Voice disorders involve abnormalities in the quality, pitch, and loudness of the sound. There are many potential causes of speech impairment: Delayed speech development is one of the common symptoms of developmentally delayed children. It occurs in 5-10% of all children. Boys are three to four times as likely to experience speech disorders as girls.

4. Q A Phonological Disorders, Functional Speech Disorders, Apraxia
Provided by Caroline Bowen, SpeechLanguage Pathologist, this page describes apraxia and several other speech disorders.
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

5. Speech Problems
Find out the causes and treatments of common speech disorders, as well as how to help a friend or classmate cope with one.
http://www.kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/sight/speech_disorders.html

KidsHealth
Teens
When you were a child just learning to talk, you may have lisped or stuttered; in fact, your relatives probably considered it cute. If you're a teen who is still stuttering, though, you may not feel like it's so endearing. You're not alone. More than 3 million Americans have the speech disorder known as stuttering (or stammering, as it's known in the United Kingdom). It's one of several conditions affecting a person's ability to speak clearly. Some Common Speech Disorders
Stuttering is a problem that interferes with fluent speech. A person who stutters may repeat the first part of a word (as in sssssing) or hold a single sound for a long time (as in caaaaaaake). Some people who stutter have trouble getting sounds out altogether. Stuttering is complex, and it can affect speech in many different ways. Cluttering is another problem that makes a person's speech difficult to understand. Like stuttering, cluttering affects the fluency, or flow, of a person's speech. Someone who clutters may speak in bursts or pause in unexpected places. The rhythm of cluttered speech may sound jerky, rather than smooth, and the speaker often seems unaware of the problem. Articulation disorders encompass a wide range of errors people can make when talking. Substituting a "w" for an "r" ("wabbit" for "rabbit"), omitting sounds ("cool" for "school"), or adding sounds to words ("pinanio" for "piano") are examples of articulation errors.

6. Apraxia Kids Web Site
Provides articles by speechlanguage pathologists, an e-mail discussion list, message board, newsletter, resources, book suggestions, news, and
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

7. Speech And Language Disorders
The Kaufman Children's Center for Speech and Language Disorders, Inc. provides early intervention to children with communication disorders including
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

8. Kaufman Children's Center For Speech Language And Sensory Disorders
KCC Speech and Language Evaluation and Treatment These services can help children with the following Apraxia of speech. Articulation disorders
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

9. Ed Chapman's Speech And Developmental Delays Page
Provides Speech and Language Milestones, acronym definitions, and links to further information about apraxia of speech, speech disorders, and developmental delays.
http://members.tripod.com/~edchapman/ParentLinks.html
Location: http://edchapman.tripod.com/ParentLinks.html Feb 02, 2005
Home
Kids Buick's Links Parents Laughs Search this site:
Case-sensitive? yes
exact fuzzy
Page Map allows you to move around this page and sub-pages quickly Places Acronyms Links Mailing Lists Test Scores ... Other Kids Places Awards email guestbook Web Rings ... Site Map Milestones Places Production Pragmatics Expressive Receptive ... EI Screening Sub Pages IEP Laughs Just Found Out Toe Walker Inspirational Story Ever been to an IEP meeting and need a laugh? CLICK HERE Acronyms
  • AAC = Augmentative and Alternative Communication ABA = Applied Behavior Analysis ACT = Adapted Cueing Technique ADA = American With Disabilities Act ADD = Attention Deficit Disorder ADHD = Attention Deficit Hyper Disorder ADL = Activities for Daily Living AFO = Ankle - Foot Orthotics AHA = American Hyperlexia Association AIT = Auditory Integrated Training AOS = Apraxia of Speech ARC = Association for Retarded Citizens APD = Auditory Processing Disorder AS = Asperger's Syndrome ASA = Autism Society of America ASD = Autism Spectrum Disorder ASHA = American Speech Language Hearing Assoc.

10. Speech Language Pathology Resources
speech disorders An Introduction to Speech Pathology and Resonance Disorders John E. Riski, Ph.D., Director, Speech Pathology Laboratory at
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

11. Speech Problems
Do you know someone who stutters or has another speech disorder? Find out how speech disorders are treated, how you can help a friend or classmate cope,
http://kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/sight/speech_disorders.html

KidsHealth
Teens
When you were a child just learning to talk, you may have lisped or stuttered; in fact, your relatives probably considered it cute. If you're a teen who is still stuttering, though, you may not feel like it's so endearing. You're not alone. More than 3 million Americans have the speech disorder known as stuttering (or stammering, as it's known in the United Kingdom). It's one of several conditions affecting a person's ability to speak clearly. Some Common Speech Disorders
Stuttering is a problem that interferes with fluent speech. A person who stutters may repeat the first part of a word (as in sssssing) or hold a single sound for a long time (as in caaaaaaake). Some people who stutter have trouble getting sounds out altogether. Stuttering is complex, and it can affect speech in many different ways. Cluttering is another problem that makes a person's speech difficult to understand. Like stuttering, cluttering affects the fluency, or flow, of a person's speech. Someone who clutters may speak in bursts or pause in unexpected places. The rhythm of cluttered speech may sound jerky, rather than smooth, and the speaker often seems unaware of the problem. Articulation disorders encompass a wide range of errors people can make when talking. Substituting a "w" for an "r" ("wabbit" for "rabbit"), omitting sounds ("cool" for "school"), or adding sounds to words ("pinanio" for "piano") are examples of articulation errors.

12. Disability Info Speech And Language Disorders Fact Sheet (FS11)
speech disorders refer to difficulties producing speech sounds or problems with voice quality.
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

13. Speech-Language Therapy
A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds, speech disorders include the following problems, according to Diane
http://kidshealth.org/parent/system/ill/speech_therapy.html

KidsHealth
Parents Caring for a Seriously or Chronically Ill Child
In a recent parent-teacher conference, your child's teacher expressed concern that your child may have a problem with certain speech or language skills. Or perhaps while talking to your child, you noticed an occasional stutter. You're not sure that your child has a problem - what should you do? Whatever your particular circumstances, it's wise to intervene quickly. A speech-language evaluation conducted by a certified speech-language pathologist can help you determine the nature of your child's difficulties. What Is Speech-Language Therapy?
Speech-language therapy is the treatment for most children with speech and/or language disorders. A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds, whereas a language disorder refers to a difficulty understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas. Speech Disorders and Language Disorders
Speech disorders include the following problems, according to Diane Paul-Brown, PhD, director of clinical issues in speech-language pathology at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA):
  • Articulation disorders include difficulties producing sounds in syllables or saying words incorrectly to the point that other people can't understand what's being said.

14. ASHA Q A About Articulation Problems
Related Articles General Information about Speech and Language Disorders Spoken Language Problems
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

15. Learning Disabilities
LD OnLine is the leading Web Site on learning disabilities, learning disorders, learning differences, attention deficit disorder, ADD, ADHD
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

16. Disability Info: Speech And Language Disorders Fact Sheet (FS11)
speech disorders refer to difficulties producing speech sounds or problems with voice speech disorders may be problems with the way sounds are formed,
http://www.nichcy.org/pubs/factshe/fs11txt.htm
NICHCY Our Publications Disability Info
A publication of the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
Speech and Language Impairments
Table of Contents
Definition
Incidence

Characteristics

Educational Implications
...
Organizations

Fact Sheet 11 (FS11)
January 2004
Approx. 5 pages when printed.
PDF version
Definition
Speech and language disorders refer to problems in communication and related areas such as oral motor function. These delays and disorders range from simple sound substitutions to the inability to understand or use language or use the oral-motor mechanism for functional speech and feeding. Some causes of speech and language disorders include hearing loss, neurological disorders, brain injury, mental retardation, drug abuse, physical impairments such as cleft lip or palate, and vocal abuse or misuse. Frequently, however, the cause is unknown.
Back to top
Incidence
More than one million of the students served in the public schools’ special education programs in the 2000-2001 school year were categorized as having a speech or language impairment. This estimate does not include children who have speech/language problems secondary to other conditions such as deafness. Language disorders may be related to other disabilities such as mental retardation, autism, or cerebral palsy. It is estimated that communication disorders (including speech, language, and hearing disorders) affect one of every 10 people in the United States. Back to top

17. Stuttering Foundation Of America Home Page
Referral Lists Speechlanguage pathologists, intensive clinics, and summer clinics listed by state and country..
http://tmsyn.an.ask.com/r?t=an&s=hb&uid=24312681243126812&sid=343126

18. Functional Speech Disorders INDEX - Caroline Bowen PhD
Speech Language Pathology information for families, students and professionals.
http://members.tripod.com/Caroline_Bowen/fsd-index.htm
Home Functional Speech Disorders
INDEX
Introduction

A child with a functional speech disorder has difficulty learning to make a specific speech sound, or a few specific speech sounds, particularly r, l, s, z and th. Functional Speech Disorder PDF
This one page article in PDF format, entitled "Functional Speech Disorder " is an information sheet for families and teachers. It provides a brief overview of the nature and management of functional speech disorders. Functional speech disorders: What are they? NEW 2004
The web page "Functional speech disorders: What are they?" provides brief, plain English information about the definition, characteristics, assessment and treatment of functional speech disorders in children and adults. Your questions about do-it-yourself assessment and therapy for children and adults are answered. Functional speech disorder: What does 'functional' mean?

19. DISORDERS OF SPEECH AND SWALLOWING
DISORDERS OF SPEECH AND SWALLOWING speech disorders may result from disruption of phonation (hoarseness), articulation (dysarthria), resonance,
http://www.bcm.edu/oto/studs/speech.html
Core Curriculum Syllabus
DISORDERS OF SPEECH AND SWALLOWING
SPEECH
  • Normal Mechanisms
    • Phonation-the production of sound by the larynx
      • Requirements
        • Approximation of vocal folds
        • Forced expiration (adequate breath support)
        • Passive vibration of free mucosal edge of vocal fold
      • Pitch determined by the fundamental frequency of vocal fold vibration
        • Dependent on vocal fold length and tension
        • Controlled by "pre-phonatory tuning" and auditory feedback
      • Intensity is dependent on subglottic pressure, which is related to:
        • Expiratory flow
        • Glottic aperture area
      • Resonance-the modulation of sound by passage through body tissues. This can be voluntarily modified by movements of the tongue, palate and pharynx, as well as by changing the position and shape of the larynx. It may also be altered by pathology.
      • Articulation-the formation of words is accomplished by voluntary movements of the upper aerodigestive tract (lips, teeth, tongue, palate, etc.) to produce:
        • Unvoiced consonants
        • The "shaping" of phonation into vocalizations

20. Speech Disorders - General
speech disorders, links to information, areas of research and academic interest.
http://www.psychnet-uk.com/clinical_psychology/clinical_psychology_developmental

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